Southern Bent-wing Bat

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Southern Bent-wing Bat - Lindy Lumsden | Southern Bent-wing Bat - Lindy Lumsden | Southern Bent-wing Bat - James Booth via NatureShare | Southern Bent-wing Bat- James Booth via NatureShare

Miniopterus schreibersii bassanii


Dark reddish-brown to dark brown fur on the back, slightly lighter on the underside. Short, rounded, roughly triangular ears, short rounded tragus, short muzzle and a distinctive domed head. This bat has a 'bent wing' appearance due to the terminal phalanx of the third finger being about four times the length of the middle phalanx. At rest, the last phalanx folds back along the first phalanx. The tail is enclosed in the tail membrane. Weight 10.5-19.5 g.


Details
Type
Mammal
Group
Animals
Placental
Biology

Generally roosts in caves, road culverts, stormwater drains and old mines. Southern colonies hibernate during the colder winter months in hibernation caves. During October-November, maternity caves are used. Single young are born in December-mid January.

Distinctive Markings

As bats moult, areas of bright rufous fur appear. Older bats appear ginger coloured.

Taxonomy
Phylum
Chordata
Class
Mammalia
Order
Chiroptera
Family
Miniopteridae
Genus
Miniopterus
Species
schreibersii bassanii

Victoria and the south-east corner of South Australia, northern and eastern coastal Australia.

Source: Atlas of Living Australia

These bats commonly have many ectoparasites attached to the wing membrane and fur. These are small orange bat-flies (Streblidae).


Interesting Facts
Diet

Carnivore, moths.

Habitat

Open grasslands, open woodland, wet and dry sclerophyll forest, rainforest, moonsoon forests and paperbark forests.

Native Status
Native to Australia